Faculty Experts

News media seek out UBC faculty expert analysis and commentary every day to help make sense of world events.

The New York Times

February 16, 2013

In the quest for love, costs vs. benefits

“Economists may seem soulless, unlikely guides to affairs of the heart. But “Dollars and Sex,” a delightful book by Marina Adshade, an economist at the University of British Columbia, may convince you otherwise.

“In the book, to be published in April by Chronicle Books, she summarizes her own research and that of other economists, and shows that forces of supply and demand indeed loom large in the implicit market for romance.”

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UBC economist Marina Adshade wrote about the market for romance – photo by Martin Dee

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CNN

May 20, 2013

Use your money to buy happier time

Special to CNN by UBC Associate Prof. Elizabeth Dunn and Harvard Associate Prof. Michael Norton

“The logic is so simple: If I work hard now, the money I earn will give me the opportunity to do all the things that make me happy later.

“What’s the catch? It turns out that when we get into the habit of working and earning, it can be hard to stop. Instead of using our time to get as much money as possible, new research suggests that we’d be better off using our money to buy happier time.”

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Prof. Elizabeth Dunn explained how money can be used to find true happiness – photo by Martin Dee


The Financial Times

June 25, 2013

Mongolian politics – a wrestling match

Guest post by UBC Assoc. Prof. Julian Dierkes

“As Mongolia gears up for its presidential election on June 26, wrestlers have increasingly become part of the political landscape. Both main parties in Mongolia now count sporting heroes among their prominent members. The Mongolian People’s Party has even nominated a former wrestling champion, B Bat-Erdene as its candidate in the election. Has Mongolian politics become a grappling sport?”

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Prof. Julian Dierkes helped explain Mongolian politics – photo by Martin Dee

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Globe and Mail

July 5, 2013

Creating a whole new language for the Man of Steel

“What does a language sound like when it only exists in written symbols? The producers of this summer’s blockbuster Superman movie, Man of Steel, ran into this problem when it comes to the native language of Krypton, the fictional and faraway planet where Superman was born. So they turned to the Okanagan Valley, where University of British Columbia professor Christine Schreyer teaches linguistic anthropology and specializes in created languages.”

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Few people have the opportunity, like Prof. Christine Schreyer, to create a new language – photo by Paul Marck

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The Toronto Star

August 13, 2013

UBC prof lobbies Oxford English dictionary to be less British

“Stefan Dollinger, a lexicographer at the University of British Columbia, says it is time the historic dictionary considers including both “batchmate” and “boondock” — which originated in India and the Philippines, respectively — as well as many other English words that have been created or evolved over the years in countries that use the language as a predominant form of communication.”

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UBC’s Stefan Dollinger thinks the Oxford dictionary needs to become less British

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The Economist

August 31, 2013

The shadow of Ypres

“Still, as Richard Price of the University of British Columbia argues in a study of the taboo on chemical weapons, chemical weapons were already seen as different from other sorts. Aerial bombardment and the ocean-going submarine, also introduced in the First World War, were quickly turned against civilians. Chemical weapons were not. Despite having used them in the fields of France, and continuing to develop and stockpile them, the great powers reaffirmed the ban on their use in the Geneva protocol of 1925.”

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UBC’s Richard Price helped us understand the taboo against chemical weapons

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The New York Times

September 17, 2013

How robots can trick you into loving them

“Elizabeth Croft, professor of mechanical engineering at the University of British Columbia, has done a study in which humans and robotic arms pass objects back and forth — a skill that would be important for a robot caregiver to get right. She has found that if a robot and a human reach for the same object simultaneously, and the robot never hesitates or varies its speed, people think the robot is being rude.”

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Prof. Elizabeth Croft studies human-robot interactions – photo by Martin Dee

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